The #1 Way to Remove Lactic Acid From Your Horse’s Muscles

image of three horses running

For performance horses and aging equines alike, the Leg Saver is the number one treatment to help remove lactic acid from your horse. Combined with trotting, this is a surefire way to address lactic acid buildup in your horse.

What Is Lactic Acid and Why Is It a Problem?

When Lactic Acid build-up is not addressed, it settles deep into the sacroiliac and spinal cord with devastating results to the long-term performance of your horse. Lactic acid is a side-effect of energy generation in the muscles without the presence of oxygen, leading to muscle acidosis and ultimately, muscle fatigue. The build-up of lactic acid causes pain in the horse’s rear end, often resulting in problems with the front legs, such as bowed tendons, wind puffs ligament, joint and hoof issues.

The Winning Combo: Trotting and Leg Saver

Strictly walking your horse for doesn’t remove this toxic lactic acid, while galloping can actually increase levels, driving it deeper into the horse’s body and spinal cord. However, the Leg Saver treatments combined with trotting resulted in increased performance levels for every breed of performance horse: Race, Grand Prix, Jumpers, Endurance, Barrel Racers, and Polo Ponies.

Lactic Acid Build-up Treatment with Leg Saver:

Treat the Tip of the Tail, Sacroiliac, and Bai Hui points simultaneously with 5 electro-pads that run down the spinal cord to the base of the tail with the Leg Saver copper coupling that secures directing on the Tip of the Tail, for about an hour. Trot your horse during or immediately following the treatment for half an hour to enhance its effectiveness. Treatment should be administered 3 days prior to the race or event, as well as the day before the event and always the day following. Maintain trotting for a couple of days post-race or event as well.

Leg Saver’s proven results are evident in our satisfied clients whose performance horses exercise pain-free post race. We are continually improving our protocols and developing new ones to ensure every horse has the best possible chance at a healthy career.

In keeping: Wishing You & Yours a very Happy Holidays and a Healthy, Happy New Year!

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